Goodness is about character: integrity, honesty, kindness, generosity, moral courage, and the like. More than anything else, it is about how we treat other people.
A good person can make another person good; it means that goodness will elicit goodness in the society; other persons will also be good.
Treat those who are good with goodness, and also treat those who are not good with goodness. Thus goodness is attained.

This illustrated children’s book is a morality play in rhyming verse, intended to teach children the importance of being nice and considerate to each other, or face the consequences.

Renie The Meanie: A Brat’s Christmas Carol

This illustrated children’s book is a morality play in rhyming verse, intended to teach children the importance of being nice and considerate to each other, or face the consequences. Read More

Book Reviews:

Renie the Meanie is a naughty little girl who places a tack on her teacher's chair and replaces her friend's shampoo with glue, among other ill-spirited pranks. When her parents try to correct her behavior, Renie only laughs. They warn her that Santa Claus doesn't give gifts to children who misbehave, yet Renie doesn't believe this and cannot understand why she ought to be good. On Christmas Eve, she sneaks downstairs to spy on Santa Claus, yet finds an unwelcome surprise instead. While this picture book is a delightful example of smoothly flowing, melodic rhymes and families who are adherents of faiths other than Christianity, there are aspects of morality in this tale. Toward the end of the story, Renie meets Satan instead of Santa Claus. She is literally scared into behaving herself. Satan pokes three puncture marks into the little girl with his pitchfork, which convinces her parents that she did indeed have a close encounter with the devil. This prompts her parents to send for a priest. Renie confesses her sins, promises good behavior in the future, and pledges "to keep herself blessed." The imagery of and references to Satan may be frightening for some small children. However, the devil does provide an interesting alternative to the classic "lump of coal" motif. Ahead of reading this story to children, parents may wish to prepare an explanation in the event that young minds fear the devil will come after them next.
Jacquelyn Gilchrist, U.S. Review of Books

Miss Wally

Miss Wally lives in Memphis, Tennessee where she taught school for 30 years and pre-schools for more than the past 20. Chronic kidney disease forced her to retire in 2015. She uses her experience to write children’s books.

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